You are viewing this page on a small screen or mobile device. Viewing on a larger screen is recommended for best navigation.

Livable Built Environment 

Vision: In 2040, Roanoke is a growing, historic cultural hub with: vibrant neighborhoods for all; housing that is safe, accessible, affordable, and varied; advanced technology to provide access opportunities for all,  connected by an integrated multi-modal, user-friendly transportation system.

The City of Roanoke is 42 square miles in area with much of that land already developed. The land that remains is either park space (e.g., Mill Mountain) or land that is steep, in a flood zone, has access issues, or is otherwise difficult to use. Recognizing the benefits and challenges of growth within the existing built form of the City of Roanoke, community members, businesses, and City staff worked together to strategize eight priorities that will help ensure that the built environment of Roanoke continues to evolve in the best manner possible to serve both existing and future generations in making the City a vibrant place to live, learn, work, play, and visit.

Growth needs to occur through the preservation and reuse of existing buildings and infrastructure. Where new development or redevelopment occurs, it should be done in a manner that is sensitive to the surrounding community. One of the benefits with developing within an existing community is that ability to make use of the existing infrastructure (i.e., streets, water and sewer systems, electrical distribution, etc.). To gain that advantage, existing infrastructure needs to be maintained and improved to allow for growth.

Much of the city was developed prior to World War II when neighborhoods contained a variety of residential uses as well as small neighborhood centers to serve the needs of neighborhood residents.  These Complete Neighborhoods are built at a human scale, are pedestrian friendly and bikeable, and meet the needs of people of all ages and abilities.

The community has overwhelmingly said that complete neighborhoods are important. Neighborhoods ideally function as complete neighborhoods when there is safe and convenient access to the goods and services needed in daily life. Future development should support existing neighborhoods with a goal of maintaining or creating complete neighborhoods throughout the City.

Complete Neighborhood Elements:

  • housing options
  • stores and other commercial services
  • quality public schools
  • public open spaces and recreational facilities
  • civic amenities
  • transportation options

The complete neighborhood is built at a human scale, is pedestrian friendly and bikeable, and meets the needs of people of all ages and abilities.

To be a complete neighborhood, a range of housing types are needed to support residents at various stages in life, from a starter home to a residence where one can age in place. Middle housing types such as accessory apartments, duplexes, or townhomes are present in some older neighborhoods in the city but are missing from others. Addressing Missing Middle Housing is important to provide a range of housing options and maintaining some affordability.

As areas of the City are developed, a focus should be put on creating a sense of place. Such place making creates various public and private spaces that are interactive and may incorporate visual art elements to create a unique and special feel.

To support the livability of our community it is important to have a transportation network that supports all modes of transportation. All city streets should be Complete Streets that support use by pedestrians, bicycles and similar transport, and transit, as well as automobile. Likewise, connections between land use, specifically neighborhood centers and transit should be strengthened to provide the best access for those residents that rely on transit and to encourage the use of transit as a preferred mode of transportation all residents.

Priority One: Growth Through Preservation and Context Sensitive Design

As a steadily growing city, Roanoke recognizes the need to plan for increasing population. Policies for this priority focus on compact development that takes into account surrounding neighborhood characteristics and patterns, and nearby natural assets.

Action Items:

  • Proposed development (infill development, alterations, renovations, and additions) should create or enhance a distinctive character that relates well to the surrounding community
  • Develop design standards reflective of the most-beloved examples of local community character
  • Increase compact development patterns in neighborhoods while retaining community character
  • Allow multiunit and cluster housing types that are compatible in scale and character with detached single-family homes

Action Items:

  • Protect rivers and streams through revised riparian buffer requirements
  • Increase tree canopy requirements
  • Incentivize trees and neighborhood beautification
  • Update the zoning ordinance to include best-practice development standards that preserve important natural areas

Action Items:

  • Develop and update a citywide preservation plan
  • Assist historic property owners to obtain historic tax and building renovation credits
  • Review and revise Architectural Design Guidelines to improve clarity and respond to new technologies and materials
  • Continue to designate future buildings, sites, and districts through the Certified Local Government program

Action Items:

  • Support significant development projects when supported by the neighborhood
  • Incentivize rehabilitation of underutilized buildings
  • Evaluate incentives for reuse of existing buildings, tax abatement, and relief of water and sewer tap fees

Priority Two: Complete Neighborhoods

Roanoke recognizes the importance of neighborhoods that provide safe and convenient access to a variety of goods and services including: housing options, commercial services, schools and places of worship, open space, and civic amenities.  Policies for this priority focus on a complete neighborhood built at a human scale that meets the needs of people of all ages and abilities.

Action Items:

  • Regularly update neighborhood plans every ten years, evaluating and recommending specific opportunities for complete neighborhoods, future land use, placemaking, housing, economic development, connectivity, and open space
  • Involve neighborhood organizations, civic groups, and businesses in the development and implementation of neighborhood plans
  • Prioritize plans for neighborhoods identified as potential target areas for community development funding

Action Items:

  • Identify and prioritize potential neighborhood center areas to target support
  • Develop a strategy for improving existing neighborhood centers, redeveloping underutilized centers, and creating new centers in key locations in the neighborhood planning process
  • Allow a wide variety of housing, employment, shopping, recreation, and transportation options within each neighborhood center
  • Cluster community-serving facilities within neighborhood centers to increase accessibility for all
  • Use the public realm to create unique features within each neighborhood center that serve as a focal point for the area

Action Items:

  • Create a transportation mobility plan prioritizing pedestrian and bicycle accommodations
  • Update and adopt street design guidelines prioritizing pedestrian and bicycle accommodations
  • Prioritize capital improvement projects to address neighborhood center areas
  • Strengthen streetscape connections between neighborhood centers and surrounding residential areas by: installing missing sidewalks, crosswalks, and shared use paths, and upgrading pedestrian infrastructure in poor condition
  • Create pedestrian area plans with right-of-way improvements tailored to the surrounding development context
  • Increase multimodal accessibility within neighborhoods
  • Provide signage linking community areas

Action Items:

  • Require all new and major redevelopment of commercial corridors and commercial centers to compliment and transition well into the surrounding neighborhoods
  • Allow a wide variety of uses that serve surrounding neighborhoods along with the broader community
  • Provide multimodal connections from neighborhoods to, along, and through the commercial corridor and/or large commercial center

Priority Three: Interactive Spaces

Roanoke recognizes that vibrant spaces for gathering create a sense of community and social interaction. Policies for this priority focus on creating physical, public places for people to come together.

Action Items:

  • Use the public realm to create unique features within each neighborhood center such as plazas, squares, and enhanced pedestrian areas that serve as focal points for the area
  • Public spaces should be designed to support multiple activities, be comfortable for both individuals and groups, provide seating opportunities and appropriate lighting, and be accessible for users of all abilities
  • Public spaces should be easily accessible by all modes of transportation
  • Paths along which pedestrians move should be safe and engaging
  • Promote partnerships to assist in the development of interactive spaces

Action Items:

  • Public spaces should include common and useable open space surrounded by active uses
  • Public spaces should be designed to support multiple activities, be comfortable for both individuals and groups, provide seating opportunities and appropriate lighting, and be accessible for users of all abilities
  • Require wide sidewalks in commercial areas

Action Items:

  • Implement the Roanoke Parks and Recreation Master Plan
  • Create parks so that citizens are within a 10 minute walk of a park
  • Promote partnerships to assist in the development of park spaces

Priority Four: Housing

Roanoke recognizes the need for housing in a range of types and levels of affordability. Policies for this priority focus on meeting the future needs of a growing and diverse population.

Action Items:

  • Perform a housing study to look at trends, needs, and current conditions of housing in the City
  • Incentivize development that includes affordability, accessibility, and context sensitive design components
  • Develop programs that enable homeowners to make continual investments to keep homes safe, accessible, and well maintained
  • Continue to allocate HOME and CDBG funds to non-profit affordable housing developers for new housing and renovation of existing housing for low income homeowners and tenants
  • Prioritize funding to affordable housing near neighborhood centers

Action Items:

  • Maintain effective code enforcement operations
  • Maintain effective relationships with neighborhoods to share ways to maintain properties
  • Continue to support the city’s rental inspection program and consider program expansion to cover new housing types/arrangements, as appropriate

Action Items:

  • Consider ways to introduce different housing types into neighborhoods that lack housing diversity while being mindful of and responsive to concerns about neighborhood character, design, and maintenance
  • Study the locations and characteristics of exemplary Missing Middle housing examples (local) that successfully fit into a neighborhood setting.  Use those findings to guide policies and standards for creating multiunit housing types in neighborhood settings
  • Encourage the development of larger Missing Middle housing buildings near neighborhood centers and along commercial corridors
  • Explore opportunities for alternative living arrangements, such as group living and co-housing, near neighborhood centers
  • Permit accessory dwelling units in all residential zones

Priority Five: Arts and Culture

Roanoke recognizes the impact arts and culture has on community well-being and tourism. Policies for this priority focus on integrating arts and cultural activities in physical design, and neighborhood revitalization strategies that highlight local talent.

Action Items:

  • Implement and update the Arts and Cultural Plan
  • Include art, culture, and history as an element of all future neighborhood plans
  • Incentivize art as a part of development and redevelopment projects
  • Include public art as part of all public facilities, public spaces, and streetscape improvement projects
  • Develop public art projects within neighborhood centers

Action Items:

  • Allow artist studio and arts center use in all multipurpose districts
  • Create a formal mural program process

Priority Six: Interconnected Transportation System

Roanoke recognizes the need to improve and expand multimodal transportation.  Policies for this priority focus on improving local transportation connections and options. 

Multimodal transportation is the use of more than one mode of transportation. These modes may include pedestrian, bicycle, scooters, buses, taxi, paratransit, cars, flights, trains, automated vehicular systems, and other future options.

Action Items:

  • Prioritize pedestrian, bicycle, and transit accommodations in and between neighborhood centers
  • Support seamless paratransit service
  • Implement the greenway plan to provide off-street transportation paths as part of a complete transportation network

Action Items:

  • Transit routes should connect and serve neighborhood centers and other activity areas in the City
  • Proposed future land use in community plans should emphasize more intensive development in the proximity of transit routes

Action Items:

  • Coordinate bus routes with the location of neighborhood centers and other activity areas
  • Improve and maintain transit stops with amenities such as shelters, posted schedules, benches, bike racks, and trash cans along all routes, prioritizing highest used routes first
  • Extend service hours to include each day of the week
  • Require right-of-way or easements for bus shelters in development and redevelopment

Priority Seven: Complete Streets

Roanoke recognizes the need for streets that are safe for all users. Policies for this priority focus on improved infrastructure and education on all modes of transportation, such as bicycling and walking.

Action Items:

  • Update Street Design Guidelines to prioritize the pedestrian and bicycle experience within neighborhoods
  • Align capital improvement program, neighborhood planning, and development standards to expand complete streets
  • Coordinate street improvements between various departments
  • Expand programs to allow temporary closure of streets for public use more frequently
  • Encourage common parking areas to enable access to multiple places/uses

Action Items:

  • Conduct and maintain a sidewalk and crosswalk inventory
  • Require sidewalk construction or replacement along streets and for circulation between buildings and activity areas as part of all development projects, unless scale is minimal
  • Improve pedestrian systems through planting shade trees, adding pedestrian scale lights, and street furniture
  • Increase funding for pedestrian system improvements

Action Items:

  • Expand, improve, and maintain on-street bicycle networks
  • Expand the use of bike lanes to include other slow moving vehicles such as scooters, electric bicycles, etc.
  • Revise the zoning ordinance to require bicycle parking
  • Increase the number of bicycle racks in neighborhood centers to provide on-street bicycle parking
  • Increase funding for bicycle network improvements

Action Items:

  • Create and implement the Vision Zero Action Plan to reduce injury and death
  • Base design standards for motorized vehicular systems around typical system usage throughout year, not peak periods

Action Items:

  • Encourage multimodal education within the school system
  • Request increasing multimodal education requirements within state driver education requirements
  • Provide multimodal education to residents within the City

Priority Eight: Improve Infrastructure

Roanoke recognizes the need for infrastructure that allows all areas of the community to grow and develop as proposed in the prior listed priorities.

Action Items:

  • Increase funding to support identified and prioritized needs from other plans and policies
  • Extend primary utility services (e.g., water, sewer, gas) to all parts of the city to provide reliable services and support development
  • Increase access to broadband
  • Adequate wireless service throughout the City consistent with the Wireless Telecommunications Policy

Action Items:

  • Identify available, timely, and appropriate public data
  • Develop systems or processes to analyze that data to support decision making

Action Items:

  • Continue to require new utility services to be located or relocated underground
  • Assess feasibility of relocating utilities underground as part of large streetscape and road construction projects
  • Minimize the size and number of free standing signs
  • Implement and periodically update the city’s Wireless Telecommunications Facility Policy to encourage the use of various stealth and small cell technology

The City of Roanoke is 42 square miles in area with much of that land already developed. The land that remains is either park space (e.g., Mill Mountain) or land that is steep, in a flood zone, has access issues, or is otherwise difficult to use. Recognizing the benefits and challenges of growth within the existing built form of the City of Roanoke, community members, businesses, and City staff worked together to strategize eight priorities that will help ensure that the built environment of Roanoke continues to evolve in the best manner possible to serve both existing and future generations in making the City a vibrant place to live, learn, work, play, and visit.

Growth needs to occur through the preservation and reuse of existing buildings and infrastructure. Where new development or redevelopment occurs, it should be done in a manner that is sensitive to the surrounding community. One of the benefits with developing within an existing community is that ability to make use of the existing infrastructure (i.e., streets, water and sewer systems, electrical distribution, etc.). To gain that advantage, existing infrastructure needs to be maintained and improved to allow for growth.

Much of the city was developed prior to World War II when neighborhoods contained a variety of residential uses as well as small neighborhood centers to serve the needs of neighborhood residents.  These Complete Neighborhoods are built at a human scale, are pedestrian friendly and bikeable, and meet the needs of people of all ages and abilities.

The community has overwhelmingly said that complete neighborhoods are important. Neighborhoods ideally function as complete neighborhoods when there is safe and convenient access to the goods and services needed in daily life. Future development should support existing neighborhoods with a goal of maintaining or creating complete neighborhoods throughout the City.

Complete Neighborhood Elements:

  • housing options
  • stores and other commercial services
  • quality public schools
  • public open spaces and recreational facilities
  • civic amenities
  • transportation options

The complete neighborhood is built at a human scale, is pedestrian friendly and bikeable, and meets the needs of people of all ages and abilities.

To be a complete neighborhood, a range of housing types are needed to support residents at various stages in life, from a starter home to a residence where one can age in place. Middle housing types such as accessory apartments, duplexes, or townhomes are present in some older neighborhoods in the city but are missing from others. Addressing Missing Middle Housing is important to provide a range of housing options and maintaining some affordability.

As areas of the City are developed, a focus should be put on creating a sense of place. Such place making creates various public and private spaces that are interactive and may incorporate visual art elements to create a unique and special feel.

To support the livability of our community it is important to have a transportation network that supports all modes of transportation. All city streets should be Complete Streets that support use by pedestrians, bicycles and similar transport, and transit, as well as automobile. Likewise, connections between land use, specifically neighborhood centers and transit should be strengthened to provide the best access for those residents that rely on transit and to encourage the use of transit as a preferred mode of transportation all residents.

Priority One: Growth Through Preservation and Context Sensitive Design

As a steadily growing city, Roanoke recognizes the need to plan for increasing population. Policies for this priority focus on compact development that takes into account surrounding neighborhood characteristics and patterns, and nearby natural assets.

Action Items:

  • Proposed development (infill development, alterations, renovations, and additions) should create or enhance a distinctive character that relates well to the surrounding community
  • Develop design standards reflective of the most-beloved examples of local community character
  • Increase compact development patterns in neighborhoods while retaining community character
  • Allow multiunit and cluster housing types that are compatible in scale and character with detached single-family homes

Action Items:

  • Protect rivers and streams through revised riparian buffer requirements
  • Increase tree canopy requirements
  • Incentivize trees and neighborhood beautification
  • Update the zoning ordinance to include best-practice development standards that preserve important natural areas

Action Items:

  • Develop and update a citywide preservation plan
  • Assist historic property owners to obtain historic tax and building renovation credits
  • Review and revise Architectural Design Guidelines to improve clarity and respond to new technologies and materials
  • Continue to designate future buildings, sites, and districts through the Certified Local Government program

Action Items:

  • Support significant development projects when supported by the neighborhood
  • Incentivize rehabilitation of underutilized buildings
  • Evaluate incentives for reuse of existing buildings, tax abatement, and relief of water and sewer tap fees

Priority Two: Complete Neighborhoods

Roanoke recognizes the importance of neighborhoods that provide safe and convenient access to a variety of goods and services including: housing options, commercial services, schools and places of worship, open space, and civic amenities.  Policies for this priority focus on a complete neighborhood built at a human scale that meets the needs of people of all ages and abilities.

Action Items:

  • Regularly update neighborhood plans every ten years, evaluating and recommending specific opportunities for complete neighborhoods, future land use, placemaking, housing, economic development, connectivity, and open space
  • Involve neighborhood organizations, civic groups, and businesses in the development and implementation of neighborhood plans
  • Prioritize plans for neighborhoods identified as potential target areas for community development funding

Action Items:

  • Identify and prioritize potential neighborhood center areas to target support
  • Develop a strategy for improving existing neighborhood centers, redeveloping underutilized centers, and creating new centers in key locations in the neighborhood planning process
  • Allow a wide variety of housing, employment, shopping, recreation, and transportation options within each neighborhood center
  • Cluster community-serving facilities within neighborhood centers to increase accessibility for all
  • Use the public realm to create unique features within each neighborhood center that serve as a focal point for the area

Action Items:

  • Create a transportation mobility plan prioritizing pedestrian and bicycle accommodations
  • Update and adopt street design guidelines prioritizing pedestrian and bicycle accommodations
  • Prioritize capital improvement projects to address neighborhood center areas
  • Strengthen streetscape connections between neighborhood centers and surrounding residential areas by: installing missing sidewalks, crosswalks, and shared use paths, and upgrading pedestrian infrastructure in poor condition
  • Create pedestrian area plans with right-of-way improvements tailored to the surrounding development context
  • Increase multimodal accessibility within neighborhoods
  • Provide signage linking community areas

Action Items:

  • Require all new and major redevelopment of commercial corridors and commercial centers to compliment and transition well into the surrounding neighborhoods
  • Allow a wide variety of uses that serve surrounding neighborhoods along with the broader community
  • Provide multimodal connections from neighborhoods to, along, and through the commercial corridor and/or large commercial center

Priority Three: Interactive Spaces

Roanoke recognizes that vibrant spaces for gathering create a sense of community and social interaction. Policies for this priority focus on creating physical, public places for people to come together.

Action Items:

  • Use the public realm to create unique features within each neighborhood center such as plazas, squares, and enhanced pedestrian areas that serve as focal points for the area
  • Public spaces should be designed to support multiple activities, be comfortable for both individuals and groups, provide seating opportunities and appropriate lighting, and be accessible for users of all abilities
  • Public spaces should be easily accessible by all modes of transportation
  • Paths along which pedestrians move should be safe and engaging
  • Promote partnerships to assist in the development of interactive spaces

Action Items:

  • Public spaces should include common and useable open space surrounded by active uses
  • Public spaces should be designed to support multiple activities, be comfortable for both individuals and groups, provide seating opportunities and appropriate lighting, and be accessible for users of all abilities
  • Require wide sidewalks in commercial areas

Action Items:

  • Implement the Roanoke Parks and Recreation Master Plan
  • Create parks so that citizens are within a 10 minute walk of a park
  • Promote partnerships to assist in the development of park spaces

Priority Four: Housing

Roanoke recognizes the need for housing in a range of types and levels of affordability. Policies for this priority focus on meeting the future needs of a growing and diverse population.

Action Items:

  • Perform a housing study to look at trends, needs, and current conditions of housing in the City
  • Incentivize development that includes affordability, accessibility, and context sensitive design components
  • Develop programs that enable homeowners to make continual investments to keep homes safe, accessible, and well maintained
  • Continue to allocate HOME and CDBG funds to non-profit affordable housing developers for new housing and renovation of existing housing for low income homeowners and tenants
  • Prioritize funding to affordable housing near neighborhood centers

Action Items:

  • Maintain effective code enforcement operations
  • Maintain effective relationships with neighborhoods to share ways to maintain properties
  • Continue to support the city’s rental inspection program and consider program expansion to cover new housing types/arrangements, as appropriate

Action Items:

  • Consider ways to introduce different housing types into neighborhoods that lack housing diversity while being mindful of and responsive to concerns about neighborhood character, design, and maintenance
  • Study the locations and characteristics of exemplary Missing Middle housing examples (local) that successfully fit into a neighborhood setting.  Use those findings to guide policies and standards for creating multiunit housing types in neighborhood settings
  • Encourage the development of larger Missing Middle housing buildings near neighborhood centers and along commercial corridors
  • Explore opportunities for alternative living arrangements, such as group living and co-housing, near neighborhood centers
  • Permit accessory dwelling units in all residential zones

Priority Five: Arts and Culture

Roanoke recognizes the impact arts and culture has on community well-being and tourism. Policies for this priority focus on integrating arts and cultural activities in physical design, and neighborhood revitalization strategies that highlight local talent.

Action Items:

  • Implement and update the Arts and Cultural Plan
  • Include art, culture, and history as an element of all future neighborhood plans
  • Incentivize art as a part of development and redevelopment projects
  • Include public art as part of all public facilities, public spaces, and streetscape improvement projects
  • Develop public art projects within neighborhood centers

Action Items:

  • Allow artist studio and arts center use in all multipurpose districts
  • Create a formal mural program process

Priority Six: Interconnected Transportation System

Roanoke recognizes the need to improve and expand multimodal transportation.  Policies for this priority focus on improving local transportation connections and options. 

Multimodal transportation is the use of more than one mode of transportation. These modes may include pedestrian, bicycle, scooters, buses, taxi, paratransit, cars, flights, trains, automated vehicular systems, and other future options.

Action Items:

  • Prioritize pedestrian, bicycle, and transit accommodations in and between neighborhood centers
  • Support seamless paratransit service
  • Implement the greenway plan to provide off-street transportation paths as part of a complete transportation network

Action Items:

  • Transit routes should connect and serve neighborhood centers and other activity areas in the City
  • Proposed future land use in community plans should emphasize more intensive development in the proximity of transit routes

Action Items:

  • Coordinate bus routes with the location of neighborhood centers and other activity areas
  • Improve and maintain transit stops with amenities such as shelters, posted schedules, benches, bike racks, and trash cans along all routes, prioritizing highest used routes first
  • Extend service hours to include each day of the week
  • Require right-of-way or easements for bus shelters in development and redevelopment

Priority Seven: Complete Streets

Roanoke recognizes the need for streets that are safe for all users. Policies for this priority focus on improved infrastructure and education on all modes of transportation, such as bicycling and walking.

Action Items:

  • Update Street Design Guidelines to prioritize the pedestrian and bicycle experience within neighborhoods
  • Align capital improvement program, neighborhood planning, and development standards to expand complete streets
  • Coordinate street improvements between various departments
  • Expand programs to allow temporary closure of streets for public use more frequently
  • Encourage common parking areas to enable access to multiple places/uses

Action Items:

  • Conduct and maintain a sidewalk and crosswalk inventory
  • Require sidewalk construction or replacement along streets and for circulation between buildings and activity areas as part of all development projects, unless scale is minimal
  • Improve pedestrian systems through planting shade trees, adding pedestrian scale lights, and street furniture
  • Increase funding for pedestrian system improvements

Action Items:

  • Expand, improve, and maintain on-street bicycle networks
  • Expand the use of bike lanes to include other slow moving vehicles such as scooters, electric bicycles, etc.
  • Revise the zoning ordinance to require bicycle parking
  • Increase the number of bicycle racks in neighborhood centers to provide on-street bicycle parking
  • Increase funding for bicycle network improvements

Action Items:

  • Create and implement the Vision Zero Action Plan to reduce injury and death
  • Base design standards for motorized vehicular systems around typical system usage throughout year, not peak periods

Action Items:

  • Encourage multimodal education within the school system
  • Request increasing multimodal education requirements within state driver education requirements
  • Provide multimodal education to residents within the City

Priority Eight: Improve Infrastructure

Roanoke recognizes the need for infrastructure that allows all areas of the community to grow and develop as proposed in the prior listed priorities.

Action Items:

  • Increase funding to support identified and prioritized needs from other plans and policies
  • Extend primary utility services (e.g., water, sewer, gas) to all parts of the city to provide reliable services and support development
  • Increase access to broadband
  • Adequate wireless service throughout the City consistent with the Wireless Telecommunications Policy

Action Items:

  • Identify available, timely, and appropriate public data
  • Develop systems or processes to analyze that data to support decision making

Action Items:

  • Continue to require new utility services to be located or relocated underground
  • Assess feasibility of relocating utilities underground as part of large streetscape and road construction projects
  • Minimize the size and number of free standing signs
  • Implement and periodically update the city’s Wireless Telecommunications Facility Policy to encourage the use of various stealth and small cell technology

Be engaged in your community

If you’d like, we will send you an email when new projects and opportunities to get involved in your community come up.

Sign Me Up!